Tag Archives: thinking

Developing Our Capacities to Think and Learn

I learn and look at what is valid or invalid in anything I choose to reflect upon, by comparing it to principles of truth and morality, then I try to figure out what lays underneath its manifestation, and I target the underlying causal forces that produce the effects, manifestations, symptoms or results. Study the effects, manifestations, symptoms or results to […]

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What is Cognitive Dissonance?

Cognitive dissonance is a warning signal about conflicts in our automatic or willful journey of understanding reality. How we resolve that internal disharmony is another issue. Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive dissonance happens when external information contradicts internal information, or when our own behavior conflicts with how others are behaving. We then feel that conflict, disunity and disharmony. That’s the general broad […]

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Great Ideas? Average Events? Small People?

“Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.” I’m sure many people have heard this, especially those who have initiated themselves into an “awakening” of looking into reality more deeply, possibly getting into “conspiracy” research to uncover the hidden machinations going on in the world. Origin Where does this saying come from? What are the meanings […]

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Cheerleader Effect – Cognitive Biases (Pt.12)

The cheerleader effect, or group-attractiveness effect, is a tendency to value appearances based on a comparative assessment with the surroundings. Certain traits will appear more attractive due to the perceived amplification from contrast. When looked at individually they no longer get the contrasting cheerleader effect. Surprisingly, this is a new term, from a 2008 “How I Met Your Mother” episode, […]

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Appeal to Possibility – Logic Comic (Pt.2)

Something might happen, possibly happen, or even be likely or probable to happen, but that doesn’t mean it will happen. When we assume something will inevitably happen because it could happen, we are engaging in the appeal to possibility or probability fallacy. Something being probable doesn’t prove it as a fact. However, this doesn’t prevent us from making decisions based […]

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Bandwagon Effect – Cognitive Biases (Pt.8)

The bandwagon effect represents the phenomena of the increasing adoption of beliefs, ideas, fads, trends, fashions, styles, and behaviors as more people accept it. The more something becomes popularized by others, the more likely even more people will adopt it into their own lives. The term “bandwagon” is used because of the political success of one campaigner in 1848 American […]

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